Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc.
Celebrating Five Years of Community Outreach and Advocacy 

Collecting Socks for Homeless People with Diabetes
                            Join us on Friday October 14 for the fall 2017 kick-off!

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. sock drive, 'Sock-It to Diabetes is a community service mission, collecting new socks to be distributed to homeless people in the metropolitan Atlanta area.

Why We Collect Socks

Foot care is an ongoing issue for diabetics. Unfortunately, homeless people face barriers to healthcare. Chronic diseases, including diabetes are frequent in homeless people. The quandary of those who are homeless living with diabetes is intensely critical, because managing diabetes compels observance to an important, serious care strategy. 

Numerous foot problems can arise with those living with diabetes. These problems can become degenerative- leading to irreversible, acute complications. Click here for more information on Diabetes Foot Complications.

Diabetes reduces blood flow and sensation to the feet. Diabetics are encouraged to wear clean socks to protect their feet.

Although socks are a basic need, for those homeless, access to socks can often be limited. Something as simple as socks can impact their life.

To prevent bacteria, it is essential for diabetics to keep their feet clean. This reduces risks of infection and life-threatening complications. This can be difficult for those who are homeless and spend days outside. 

In an effort to improve care for this vulnerable population; and to reduce the high risk of developing serious foot complications, Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. collaborates with community partners to distribute socks collected for the homeless. Donated socks are collected by a group of volunteers. Upon receiving the socks, sock beneficiaries receive diabetes health and wellness education from certified diabetes educators.

During our 2013 Holiday sock drive, with the help of generous supporters and donors we are able to spread holiday cheer by distributing nearly 300 pairs of socks to those in need. The socks collected were delivered to Hosea Feed The Hungry Community Center, Grady Memorial Hospital Crisis Intervention Unit, and Grady Memorial Hospital Diabetes Clinic.

During our 2014 mission, because of the great need for socks, we have decided to collect socks year-round. We can arrange for a sock donation pick-up.

Type of Socks Needed: Diabetic socks- non-binding and non-elasticated socks designed so as to not constrict the foot or leg. Low-cut and mid-calf styles, white in color is preferable for people with open wounds or sores, as this could alert wearers with compromised sensation to a draining wound.

Sturdy white socks can be donated as well.  

Please consider making a monetary donation to support this mission. You may donate online by clicking the Donate Now Button on our Ways To Give page. You may enter your own contribution amount. 

To volunteer and help with our 2017 mission, please send an email with your name and contact phone number to info@fightdiabetesnow.org. Please list "Sock Drive" in the subject line. You may also contact our office and leave a voice message at ext. 2 for Community Outreach Director, Marilyn Leach-Williams. 

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

Message of Thanks
​I just wanted to Thank You ever so much for the clothing donation (of socks) to the Grady Crisis intervention Unit. We see hundreds of people every month and many of them come in with no clothes or having clothes that have to be destroyed for health safety reasons. Your donation will allow us to provide needed items to many of our patients so that they can leave the hospital in the best possible condition. Again we want to thank you for your donation that you brought in Today (1-20-14) and encourage you that in the future if you have more of the same or other times to donate to the less fortunate of the Metro Area you will again come to Grady. Thank you for your Support and Have a Blessed day and year. - Christopher P. Andrews LPC, Behavior Health Manager